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What is the
Community Cares Challenge?

The Community Cares Challenge provides you the opportunity to become a Community Cares Champion!

Champions will complete three guided modules to learn more about preventing substance misuse. Each module takes you through facts, videos, links, and graphics to help you understand what substance misuse means to you and how you can prevent it.

Community Cares Champions are informed, empowered, and dedicated to making their neighborhoods better by reducing risks of substance misuse in themselves and others. Complete all three modules and quizzes to earn your Community Cares Champion certificate. Certificates may be printed with your name and include valuable coupons for White County vendors.

But the biggest reward of all is knowing that you are a knowledgeable champion fighting substance use disorder in your community!

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Children from substance abusing families are more likely
to have learning disabilities; repeat more grades; attend
more schools; and are more likely to be truant, delinquent
and drop out of school because of pregnancy, expulsion
or institutionalization.

Source:
www.aaets.org/traumatic-stress-library/
effects-of-parental-substance-abuse-
on-children-and-families

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Often an individual with SUDs
develops additional health
issues, such as mental
health conditions, stroke,
cancer, lung and heart issues,
and dental problems.

Drugs can alter important brain areas
that are necessary for life-sustaining functions
and can drive the compulsive drug use that marks addiction.
10.3% of Indiana children
have lived with someone who had
a problem with alcohol or drugs,
compared to 8.5% nationally.


Source: Indiana Department of Child Services

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Children feel a wide variety of
emotions when living with a parent
that has SUD. Some of these include:
guilt, anxiety, embarrassment,
confusion, anger, depression, and the
inability to have close relationships.

Source:
https://www.aacap.org/AACAP/
Families_and_Youth/Facts_for_Families/
FFF-Guide/Children-Of-Alcoholics-017.aspx

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Currently, in America,
1 in 35 children
lived in households with at least one parent who had
an illicit drug use disorder in the past year. 

Source:
www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/
default/files/report_3223/
ShortReport-3223.html

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Time to check out...this Quiz!

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Be a part of your child’s life and have open communication with them.

As children get older, it may be harder to stay involved, but it is important for a
parent to be there physically as well as emotionally. Attend events that involve
your child, like a sports game or a recital. Also, lend your emotional support by
asking about your child’s day and letting him or her know that you are there for
support if your child seems upset. Having an open communication line allows
your child to feel comfortable in bringing up uncomfortable topics with you,
and be free from judgment. Make talking and listening a habit with your children.
This communication is best started early.

Information in this module is from: AmericanAddictionCenters.org

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- GIGAN-TRON -

Be a good role model.

“Though you may not realize it, your behavior impacts your child more than you know.”

Model good behavior.
Do not abuse drugs or alcohol yourself.
Set examples of having fun without alcohol.
Do not discuss stories of alcohol or drug use when you were
young unless they come with a lesson.

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Educate them on the risks of substance abuse.

Talk about drugs and alcohol. Do not avoid the subject if you are
unsure of what to say. Educate yourself! Ask your pediatrician for
information, scour the internet for reputable sources, ask local resources.
Talk to your children about the harmful effects of drugs on the body, which
may inhibit their ability to play sports, do activities, etc. Relate to your child.
Correct your children about myths and information that they may have,
such as everyone drinks or marijuana won’t hurt me.

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Create a clear set of rules.

Sometimes parents make rules unclear or enforce them too harshly,
causing children to react negatively or rebel.

Set consequences for bad behavior and talk about the rules with your child
to make sure he or she understands them.

Like any behavior, reward your child for acting appropriately and enforce
punishment if he or she behaves poorly. If a child understands and respects your
limits, he or she will be less likely to push them.

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Be aware of potential substances that can be abused in your home,
and have them stored properly.

These days, many children are turning to their parents’ medicine cabinet for
prescription drugs. More than 4.5 million
children have reported abusing prescription
drugs, the NYS Department of Health
reported. Know what is in your cabinet
and lock it. The same goes for alcohol. Be
aware of what you have and keep it out of
sight and in a place your child cannot access it.

Click the graphic to view a larger version:

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- GIGAN-TRON -

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Quiz

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Other parents
should know what I
know. How can I
spread the word?

Explore objects in the room to
get information about spreading
the word!

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Volunteer with the United
Council on Opioids to help fight
the opioid crisis in White County,
as well as like the United Council
on Opioids on Facebook. Invite
your friends and fellow parents
to join you.
www.whitecountyunitedway.org/
opioids.html

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Tell other parents about “stash
containers” that are sold on Amazon.
These stash containers are designed
to look like everyday objects,
such as a water bottle, but really
conceal substances such as
marijuana.

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Invite other parents to
visit websites such as

www.samhsa.gov

and

www.drugabuse.gov

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Discourage stigma and
set a positive example!
Learn more here!

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Be vigilant about your kid's prescriptions!
Ask doctors if opioids are really
necessary and monitor the
dispensation of those drugs
carefully if they are prescribed.

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Quiz

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